Events

Prof. Seth Bank Awarded Prestigious NSF Quantum Information Programs

The University of Texas professor Seth Bank is involved in two new multi-university million dollar multi-disciplinary projects from the National Science Foundation aimed at fostering collaboration in quantum information and computation research.  The foundation of both projects is a new class of artificial semiconductor materials developed in Bank’s lab that are engineered at the few atom scale to exhibit electronic and optical properties not found in nature.

NASCENT and MRSEC host Research Experiences Poster Symposium

The Nanomanufacturing Systems for Mobile Computing and Mobile Energy Technologies Engineering Research Center (NASCENT ERC) and the Center for Dynamics and Control of Materials - Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (CDCM MRSEC) hosted a poster symposium on Friday, July 27, 2018 in the Engineering and Education Research Center (EER) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) to display the work of participants in their Summer Research Experiences Programs.

Solar Energy Storage Problem May be Solved in New Single-System Technology

Generating power from the sun isn’t the problem. The technology has been there for decades. Storing that power efficiently, however, has been a challenge.

That’s why the Department of Energy has awarded $3 million to engineering researchers at The University of Texas at Austin to overcome the Achilles’ heel of the solar power story since Day One: how to store its energy.

How a Graphene Tattoo Could Monitor your Health

The BBC recently featured the work of Texas ECE professor Deji Akinwande on the graphene tattoo:

A graphene-based tattoo that could function as a wearable electronic device to monitor health has been developed at the University of Texas.

Gold is often used in electronic components, but graphene is more conductive, can be hundreds of times thinner and allows the tattoo to wrinkle naturally with skin.

It is hoped that as the cost of graphene falls, such tattoos will become affordable for medical use.

 

Jean Anne Incorvia

Jean Anne Incorvia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Incorvia is focused on developing practical nano devices for the future of computing using emerging physics and materials. This has included research in fabricating spintronic logic devices and circuits, new types of magnetic memory using spin orbit torque effects, the intersection of 2D materials and spintronics, and using low-dimensional materials for interconnects and transistors.